Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

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Gloria
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Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by Gloria » Wed Nov 06, 2013 6:45 pm

Does anyone have a map of the ash sites in Springfield? I'm wondering if any of the 10 houses demolished using NSP 1 and NSP 3 had ash or if they were tested and cleared.

If they have ash, they would need to go through this process, I would imagine.

http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src ... compliance
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Gloria
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Re: Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by Gloria » Wed Nov 06, 2013 6:49 pm

Toxic Hazards

Toxic Chemicals and Radioactive Hazards

Question:
How does the environmental review for HUD-assisted projects address toxic chemicals or radioactive hazards?

Answer:
HUD policy, as described in 24 CFR 50.3(i), provides that all property proposed for use in HUD programs be free of hazardous materials, contamination, toxic chemicals and gasses, and radioactive substances, where a hazard could affect the health and safety of occupants or conflict with the intended utilization of the property. HUD environmental review of multifamily (housing with five or more units) and non-residential properties shall include evaluation of previous uses of the site and other evidence of contamination on or near the site, to assure that occupants of proposed sites are not adversely affected by the hazards. HUD will not approve the provision of financial assistance to residential properties located on contaminated sites that are not found to meet the above criterion. Sites known or suspected to be contaminate by toxic chemicals or radioactive materials include, but are not limited to, sites which:

are on the EPA Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) or the list of CERCLIS sites, or an equivalent State list;
are located within 3,000 feet of a toxic or solid waste landfill site; or
have an underground storage tank. For information on toxic releases regarding CERCLIS, RCRIS, landview mapping maintained by the Right-to-Know Network.

Projects Under 24 CFR part 58

Question:
Does HUD policy at 24 CFR 50.3(i) apply to projects subject to 24 CFR part 58?

Answer:
A conforming amendment is being made to 24 CFR 58(i), which will replace the reference to HUD Notice 79-33--Policy Guidance to Address the Problems Posed by Toxic Chemicals and Radioactive Materials (issued September 10, 1979). HUD is amending 24 CFR 58(i) to conform with 24 CFR 50.3(i). The new provision would reflect the general HUD policy that regardless of whether the environmental reviews are performed by HUD or by the responsible entity, the same standards would be used. The proposed provision would state HUD's policy that property proposed for use in HUD programs must be free of hazardous materials, contamination, toxic chemicals and gases, and radioactive substances, where a hazard could affect the health and safety of occupants of the property or conflict with the intended utilization of the property. Environmental reviews for multifamily housing with five or more units (including leasing) and non-residential property must include evaluation of previous site uses and other evidence of contamination on or near the site. The entity responsible for compliance with 24 CFR part 58 must give particular attention to any proposed site on or in the general proximity of areas that contain or may have contained hazardous waste, such as dumps, landfills, and industrial sites.


ASTM Phase I

Question:
Does HUD policy require an ASTM Phase I for the environmental review?

Answer:
HUD policy as stated in 24 CFR 50.3(i) relies on a general performance standard, which could also include a Phase I environmental assessment for toxics, a standard issued by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) (see document: ASTM E 1527). Some HUD programs such as mortgage insurance for Multifamily Housing already require an ASTM Phase I report, which is a real estate transaction standard with respect to the range of contaminants within the scope of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and petroleum products. This test permits a user to satisfy one of the requirements to qualify for the innocent landowner defense to CERCLA liability as to "all appropriate inquiry into the previous ownership and uses of the property consistent with good commercial or customary practice" as defined in 42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.)

Existing Real Properties

Question:
Does HUD policy at 24 CFR 50.3(i) apply to assisted existing real properties?

Answer:
For assisted existing multifamily and non-residential properties, paragraphs (1) through (4) of 24 CFR 50.3(i) apply and are to be addressed within the environmental review, as appropriate.

For assisted existing single-family homes, only paragraph (1) of 24 CFR 50.3(i) applies and is to be considered within the environmental review, as appropriate. For individual 1 to 4 single family units of existing housing, one would need to assess the site history, surroundings, and evaluate the likelihood of hazardous conditions existing nearby or on the property which could affect the health and safety of proposed occupants. These findings and observations would then be recorded in the environmental review record.
http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src ... w/qa/toxic
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movedsouth
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Re: Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by movedsouth » Wed Nov 06, 2013 8:52 pm

I think only the south west quadrant has ash.

Debbie Thompson
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Re: Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by Debbie Thompson » Fri Nov 08, 2013 1:09 pm

Well, the other quadrants probably do too. But the SW quadrant was the one tagged by the EPA as being part of Brown's Ash Dump associated with the 5th and Cleveland incinerator. Magically, the wind-carried ash (if there ever was any...the wind studies have been pretty much trashed, but EPA refuses to move the boundaries...but I digress.) Magically, this purported ash hit an invisible wall at 8th and Main, and didn't contaminate anything north or east of there. Can you feel my scepticism? It would be hard to miss. :-)

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jbm32206
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Re: Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by jbm32206 » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:42 pm

Contact Helen Albee...remember she was involved in that law suit
"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals."
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Re: Demolition and Ash Sites: Environmental Review

Post by JaxUnicorn » Sat Nov 23, 2013 9:31 am

We may be able to check Project New Ground's website for a map.
~Kim Pryor
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